Resources

Treaty Workshops: Summer intensives for teachers now available

David’s knowledge and humour helped to make a lot of history fit together and make sense. The visuals and materials helped make his story come alive!
~ Paul C., high school educator, Brantford

Anishnaabe author David D Plain of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and filmmaker/designer Monica Virtue of Woodstock, Ontario, are booking one-day, two-day and three-day summer intensives for Southern Ontario school boards looking to provide training about treaties. The workshops feature custom agendas that target both Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants, fusing traditional oral storytelling with interactive mapping, animations and videos. David and Monica discuss wampum treaties, cession treaties, and the various ways the treaties were broken. The workshops end with the topics of de-colonization and reconciliation.

David’s voice is predominant in the first half of the workshops as he discusses Indigenous spirituality, ceremonies and traditions before leading into canoe routes. While David tells the Anishnaabeg migration story, Monica maps his story in real-time using Google Earth. David then discusses the following struggles with other contending First Nations and colonial powers and the different wampum exchanged to end them, sharing physical items like a replica Two Row wampum and a calumet.

Two Row wampum.

Monica uses maps to explain colonization through the land agreements known as cession or “surrender” treaties. She then discusses the ways the Department of Indian Affairs broke the treaties, such as through Indian Act surrenders, the Oliver Act, and enfranchisement. Data visualization is used to explain complicated concepts like Aboriginal title and the structure of the Department of Indian Affairs. Equal weight is given to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous knowledge, with comparisons drawn between world views as told through the Anishnaabe and Western creation stories. Monica often refers back to David’s portion of the workshop to stress how archival research and traditional knowledge can dovetail and support each other.

Each workshop is modified to reflect the territory in which it is held. David addresses the specific wampum that were exchanged over that territory, while Monica speaks to the particular cession treaties, Indian Act surrenders, and other treaty-breaking that occurred within the region. Indigenous attendees from that territory are welcomed to share their knowledge to make sure their understandings dovetail with that of the presenters.

One-day, two-day and three-day training sessions are now being booked for the summer months. Please fill out the form below to inquire into which dates are still available.


Follow us

“Like” our Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/TreatyWorkshops

Online

Learn more at:
http://treatyworkshops.com


Request an estimate

To request a custom-tailored agenda for your region and target audience, along with an estimate for an appropriate length of workshop, please fill out the form below. We will respond within 5 to 7 business days.

Thank you. Miigwech.

Resources

Treaty Workshops: Now booking for February 2018

The workshop was such a great opportunity for my students. David’s knowledge and humour helped to make a lot of history fit together and make sense. The visuals and materials helped make his story come alive!
~ Paul C., high school educator, Brantford

Anishnaabe author David D Plain of the Aamjiwnaang First Nation and filmmaker/designer Monica Virtue of Woodstock, Ontario, are now booking Treaty Workshops with libraries, schools, First Nations and other community groups. The workshops feature custom agendas that target both Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants of all ages, and fuse traditional oral storytelling with interactive mapping, animations and videos. The two discuss wampum treaties, cession treaties, and the various ways the treaties were broken. The workshops end with the topic of de-colonization, reconciliation and world building.

David’s voice is predominant in the first half of the workshops as he discusses Indigenous spirituality, ceremonies and traditions before leading into canoe routes. While David tells the Anishnaabeg migration story, Monica maps his story in real-time using Google Earth. David then discusses the following struggles with other contending First Nations and colonial powers and the different wampum exchanged to end them, sharing physical items like a replica Two Row wampum and a calumet.

Two Row wampum.

Monica uses maps to explain colonization through the land agreements known as cession or “surrender” treaties. She discusses the ways the Department of Indian Affairs broke the treaties, such as through Indian Act surrenders, the Oliver Act, and enfranchisement. Data visualization is used to explain complicated concepts, such as Aboriginal title and the structure of the Department of Indian Affairs. Equal weight is given to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous knowledge, with comparisons drawn between world views as told through the Anishnaabe and Western creation stories. Monica often refers back to David’s portion of the workshop to stress how archival research and traditional knowledge can dovetail and support each other.

Each workshop is modified to reflect the territory in which it is held, and David and Monica welcome Indigenous attendees from that territory to share their knowledge to make sure of the correct pronunciation of words and that their understandings dovetail with that of the presenters. Workshops are also age-specific, whether designed for a two-day training session for teachers or a two-hour intensive with students.

Some dates are still available for late January, with bookings being accepted throughout February and into the fall school term.


Follow us

“Like” our Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/TreatyWorkshops

Online

Learn more at:
http://treatyworkshops.com


Request an estimate

To request a custom-tailored agenda for your region and target audience, along with an estimate for an appropriate length of workshop, please fill out the form below. We will respond within 5 to 7 business days.

Thank you. Miigwech.

Resources

Treaty Workshops: Now booking for January 2018

Having the authentic information provided by David and Monica in an engaging, age appropriate manner enabled our students to connect their in-class learning to that of real life explanations and situations. Collectively, it has changed our thinking, perceptions, and future actions for the better.
~ Tasha C., educator, grades 6/7, Brantford

Anishnaabe author David D Plain, from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation, and filmmaker/designer Monica Virtue, from Woodstock, Ontario, have partnered to bring Treaty Workshops to schools, municipalities, First Nations and other community groups. The workshops feature custom agendas that target both Indigenous and non-Indigenous participants of all ages, and fuse traditional oral storytelling with interactive mapping, animations and videos. The two discuss wampum treaties, cession treaties, and the various ways the treaties were broken. The workshops end with the topic of de-colonization, reconciliation and world building.

David’s voice is predominant in the first half of the workshops as he discusses Indigenous spirituality, ceremonies and traditions before leading into canoe routes. While David tells the Anishnaabeg migration story and later struggles with other contending First Nations and colonial powers, Monica maps his story in real-time using Google Earth. David then discusses various wars and the different wampum exchanged to end them, sharing physical items like a replica Two Row wampum and a calumet.

The workshop was such a great opportunity for my students. David’s knowledge and humour helped to make a lot of history fit together and make sense. The visuals and materials helped make his story come alive!
~ Paul C., high school educator, Brantford

Monica uses maps to explain colonization through the land agreements known as cession or “surrender” treaties. She discusses the ways the Department of Indian Affairs broke the treaties, such as through Indian Act surrenders, the Oliver Act, and enfranchisement. Data visualization is used to explain complicated concepts, such as Aboriginal title and the structure of the Department of Indian Affairs. Equal weight is given to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous knowledge, with comparisons drawn between world views as told through the Anishnaabe and Western creation stories. Monica often refers back to David’s portion of the workshop to stress how archival research and traditional knowledge can dovetail and support each other.

Treaty of Niagara 1764 wampum.

Each workshop is modified to reflect the territory in which it is held, and David and Monica welcome Indigenous attendees from that territory to share their knowledge to make sure of the correct pronunciation of words and that their understandings dovetail with that of the presenters. Workshops are also age-specific, whether designed for a recent two-day training session for 50 elementary school teachers or a recent two-hour intensive with 70 students from grades six to eight.

My favourite part of the workshop was seeing how our students were able to make the relevant present day connections with the past information.
~ Tasha C., educator, grades 6/7, Brantford

As attendees leave the workshops, David and Monica encourage them to carry the spirit of the original intent of the treaties out into the world with them. One way this is achieved is through an activity that involves the explanation of the word daawed, which is Anishnaabemowin for “reciprocal trade.” While David explains the meaning of daawed, Monica distributes a small bag containing two pieces of candy (such as lollipop) to half of the attendees. After the candy is distributed, Monica asks those who have a surplus of candy to decide if they’d like to keep their surplus for themselves, or if they’d like to share their surplus with those around them. Once the attendees begin opening their candy bags, it is explained that those who are sharing with their neighbours likely hold an Indigenous worldview, while those who hoard their candy for themselves are likely holding a colonized or Western worldview. This activity has an emotional impact on the participants, and they are encouraged to communicate what they have learned on social media so that teachers can track the discussions of their students and the public can learn from those who now have a deeper understanding the the treaties and the meaning behind them.


Who we are

David D Plain

David D Plain is an Indigenous historian/author and gifted speaker from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation. One of his books won a Golden Scribe award in 2008, and he was a finalist for an Eric Hoffer Award in 2014. He has published three non-fiction history books and one historical fiction. David also published a poetry book in 2016 as well as co-authored the screenplay for a one-hour TV drama series based on his historical fiction. David holds a Master of Theological Studies degree from Tyndale Seminary, Toronto, Canada.

Monica Virtue

Monica Virtue is a settler from Woodstock, Ontario. During the Ipperwash Inquiry in 2005 she was hired by the law firm representing the Estate of Dudley George to create an educational documentary on the history of the Ipperwash Provincial Park lands. Since then, she has conducted substantial archival research into treaties, the Indian Act and colonization, and has conducted co-designed research using counter-mapping techniques and GIS technology. Monica holds a BA in Communication Studies, a post-graduate certificate in Advanced Television & Film, and most recently graduated from OCAD University in 2016 with a Master of Design in Digital Futures.

Joining forces

While Monica has tapped into David’s knowledge for years regarding her various Ipperwash projects, the two had not collaborated together until this past July when the Aamjiwnaang Heritage & Culture: E’Maawizidijig asked them to present together for “Treaty Day.” Realizing that two brains were better than one, they soon partnered on a two-day training workshop for a local school board. Since then, they have booked longer training workshops with other school boards, and shorter workshops with university, high school and elementary students, and with public libraries.


Follow us

“Like” our Facebook page at:
https://www.facebook.com/TreatyWorkshops

Online

Learn more at:
http://treatyworkshops.com


Request an estimate

To request a custom-tailored agenda for your region and target audience, along with an estimate for an appropriate length of workshop, please fill out the form below. We will respond within 5 to 7 business days.

Thank you. Miigwech.

Digital Futures

Subscribe: Receive updates on Ipperwash projects via newsletter

Monica Virtue is filmmaker, designer and researcher of Scottish descent from Woodstock, Ontario. Five generations of her family have vacationed at Ipperwash Beach. She began working on a documentary on the “Ipperwash Crisis” in 2002, and since then has developed a number of different ongoing projects that have grown out of the material.

To subscribe to newsletter updates on her various projects, simply follow the link below. Please indicate which projects you are interested in hearing more about. Some projects are sensitive in nature, and communications about them may be restricted to family members or community members of the Kettle & Stony Point First Nation until such time as the projects are ready to be shared with the wider public. Please include as much information about yourself as possible to help determine which newsletter fits you best.

If you have any questions, please contact Monica today. No question is too silly to ask, and she will try to get back to you within 48 hours.

Thank you! Miigwetch!

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Resources

Resources: Treaty Workshops Now Available Across Southern Ontario

Monica Virtue (MDes), a filmmaker and researcher from Woodstock, Ontario, has partnered with David D Plain (MTS), an Elder and author from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation, to bring Treaty Workshops to Southern Ontario schools, municipalities, and other community groups interested in learning about the interwoven history of how Indigenous people and settlers came to share the land and call it home.

The three-day, one-day and four-hour workshops provide an in-depth history of early Anishinaabeg territory, with David contributing a detailed oral storytelling of how various Indigenous nations came to be located across Southern Ontario.

Wampum belt for the 1764 Treaty of Niagara.

Monica builds on David’s knowledge by starting with a discussion about how counter-mapping can be used as a tool to regain control from the dominant power structures. Using maps, she discusses negotiations for the various land agreements and treaties. From there she covers the structure of the Department of Indian Affairs, and examines how the Department was used to systematically colonize Canada. She also discusses how various sections of the Indian Act, such as land surrenders, were used to fast-track the creation of colonial developments such as Sarnia’s Chemical Valley.

Chemical Valley, located south of the City of Sarnia.

Overall, the workshops focus on the ways that oral storytelling and archival research can dovetail and fit together to paint a full picture of the true history of the land. Maps are used throughout to help visualize the changing legal status of the land and explain how it impacted the environment, the people and the animals already living on it. Each Treaty Workshop ends with a discussion about de-colonization, reconciliation, and building a stronger nation-to-nation relationship.

To request a custom-tailored agenda for your region and target audience, along with a quote for the various workshops available, please contact us by filling out the form below.

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Resources

Resources: Treaty Workshops Now Available

Monica Virtue has partnered with David D Plain, an Elder and author from the Aamjiwnaang First Nation, to bring Treaty Workshops to schools, municipalities, community groups and anyone else interested in learning about the interwoven history of Southwestern Ontario’s Indigenous people and the settler Canadians who call the land home.

The one-day and three-day workshops provide an in-depth history of early Anishinaabeg territory, with David contributing a detailed oral storytelling of how the Aamjiwnaang First Nation came to be located on the St. Clair River near Lake Huron.

Wampum belt for the 1764 Treaty of Niagara.

Monica builds on David’s knowledge by starting with a discussion about how counter-mapping can be used as a tool to regain control from the dominant power structures. Using maps, she discusses negotiations between the Anishinaabeg and the British for the 1827 Huron Tract treaty. From there she covers the structure of the Department of Indian Affairs, and examines how the Department was used to colonize Canada. She also discusses the various sections of the Indian Act, such as land surrenders, that were used to fast-track the creation of Sarnia’s Chemical Valley.

Chemical Valley, located south of the City of Sarnia.

Overall, the workshops focus on the ways that oral storytelling and archival research can dovetail and fit together to paint a full picture of the true history of the land. Each Treaty Workshop ends with a discussion about de-colonization, reconciliation, and building a stronger nation-to-nation relationship.

For more information, download the brochure (PDF – 261 KB).

Questions? Please contact us by filling out the form below.

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Ipperwash

The Ipperwash Recommendations: First Nations in Ontario

View the Recommendations that are the responsibility of the:


FIRST NATIONS IN ONTARIO:

PART 2 OF THE IPPERWASH INQUIRY

Chapter 4 – Settling Land Claims

4. The governments of Ontario, Canada, and First Nations should jointly select the head of the Treaty Commission of Ontario – the Treaty Commissioner of Ontario. The selection process should be set out in the statute following discussions among the parties. The Treaty Commissioner should serve for a fixed but renewable term and should be removed only upon agreement by First Nations and the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. [Shared responsibility]

8. Access to the Ontario land claims process should depend entirely on whether the documentation filed by the First Nation provides prime facie evidence that there has been a breach of the legal obligations of the Crown. [Shared responsibility]

12. The federal government should cooperate fully with the provincial government and First Nations in Ontario to establish the Treaty Commission of Ontario and promote its effectiveness. [Shared responsibility]

Chapter 5 – Natural Resources

16. The provincial government should continue to work with Aboriginal organizations in Ontario to develop co-management arrangements and resource-sharing initiatives. The provincial government should also provide financial or other support to Aboriginal organizations and third parties to develop capacity, identify best practices, and formulate strategies to promote co-management and resource-sharing. [Shared responsibility]

18. The Ministry of Natural Resources and First Nations should work together to update and improve the Interim Enforcement Policy. This process should include discussions on how to evaluate and monitor the implementation of the policy and on how to improve the transparency and accountability of MNR enforcement activities. [Shared responsibility]

Chapter 9 – Policing Aboriginal Occupations

51. Federal, provincial, municipal, and First Nation governments should actively promote public education and community information about significant Aboriginal protests. The OPP should also actively promote public education and community information. [Shared responsibility]

53. The provincial government, First Nations organizations, the OPP, and other police services in Ontario should develop networks promoting communication, understanding, trust, and collaboration during Aboriginal occupations and protests. The following elements should be included in this effort:

a. The OPP and First Nations organizations in Ontario should develop public safety, communications, and/or operational protocols.

b. The OPP and First Nations police services should jointly plan for responding to Aboriginal occupations and protests. Existing protocols between the OPP and First Nation police services should be amended to include references to occupations and protests.

c. The provincial government, the OPP, and representatives from municipal police services should develop resources, practices, or protocols to assist municipal police services during Aboriginal occupations and protests in urban areas.

d. The OPP and the Ministry of Natural Resources should develop an operational protocol consistent with the purposes and practices in the OPP Framework for Police Preparedness for Aboriginal Critical Incidents.

e. The OPP should provide crisis negotiator training to First Nations police services. [Shared responsibility]

58. Federal, provincial, and First Nation governments should commit to developing long-range plans for First Nation policing in Ontario. [Shared responsibility]

59. Federal, provincial, and First Nation governments should commit to developing a secure legislative basis for First Nation police services in Ontario. [Shared responsibility]


Compiled by: Maynard “Sam” George and Monica Virtue (March 2008)

To view the original Final Report of the Ipperwash Inquiry please visit:

http://www.ipperwashinquiry.ca